The Children’s House believes that providing an exciting and extensive education to young children is critical in developing lifelong learners. Children thrive in an environment where they explore, touch and play. They become confident and secure. We believe in fostering the natural curiosity and excitement that children have for learning.

Children need opportunities to plan, explore, and grow in a creative, happy and healthy way. Your child should finish each visit feeling positive, good about themselves, and having learned about the world around them and their place in it.

The Children’s House is a Montessori-inspired Preschool, Daycare and Kindergarten. At our various centers, we care for children as young as 6 weeks (select locations) and up to 6th grade. We have worked for over 20 years to develop a unique educational model that blends the best of traditional and Montessori teaching methods. All of our schools offer toddler care, Pre-School, Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten classes.

Per our conversation Friday, I wanted to share how pleased we are with the program at the Children’s House and also let you know how much we appreciate everything! We are very pleased with the program at the children’s house and the results we have seen in both of our boys. We appreciate how professional, dedicated, caring and interactive the teachers/staff are with the children and parents. Not only is the Children’s House a place for kids to play, but it’s an opportunity for them to grow, learn and develop! As a parent, it’s a joy to see your child excited for school every day! Thanks for all you do!” ~ Lyndse & Steven Swann

A COMPARISON OF TRADITIONAL TEACHING PRACTICES & MONTESSORI METHOD

TRADITIONAL

Method
  • grouped by age
  • fantasy play
  • teacher corrects errors
  • group-learning-lecture based
  • teacher schedules work time
  • cognitive development delayed,
  • social development encouraged
  • progress determined by standardized testing
  • and mass evaluations
  • work because they are told to
  • information is presented not discovered
  • materials used in many ways
  • without previous instruction
  • teacher sets pace
  • few organizational patterns
  • teacher directed
  • teacher assists child with problems